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The most recent meeting of the Invisible College of UFO researchers took place in Paris in July 2014. Sponsored by the CNES (Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales), the French equivalent of NASA, the meeting involved scientists and UFOlogists from around the world who discussed the methods and tools needed to improve the collection and analysis of UFO information. Among those attending were Richard Haines, Méheust Bertrand, Ron Westrum, and, of course, Jacques Vallee, who 40 years ago wrote a book on this informal network of dedicated researchers entitled The Invisible College: What a Group of Scientists Has Discovered About UFO Influence on the Human Race. The book has just been reprinted by Anomalist Books, and in the foreword to this new edition Vallee notes that the questions he first raised all those decades ago remain current. This reprint is an effort to make a new generation of interested readers aware of those important issues (without paying exorbitant used-book prices for it).

A Most Wonderful Book

September 8, 2014

The response to the publication of Seeing Fairies: From the Lost Archives of the Fairy Investigation Society, Authentic Reports of Fairies in Modern Times by Marjorie T. Jonhson has been swift and overwhelmingly positive. Fortean researcher Theo Paijmans kicked it off with a Tweet: “I think this is the most wonderful book published so far this year.” Author and fortean Janet Bord, writing in Magonia,  found the experience of reading this book “a disturbing experience. [The stories in this book] give the impression that the countryside is heavily populated with little people who live alongside us but are never seen by most of us. Can this really be true?…Wherever the truth is to be found, this book is essential reading for anyone with the slightest interest in fairies and the Little People.” Chris Woodyard of Haunted Ohio added: “Whatever we call them, and whatever guise they wear, it is fascinating to see the points at which the worlds of the fairies and other supernatural entities intersect.” The Fairy Folklorist commented: “This book truly does open a great many new and exciting doors into fairy research…An essential read for all dedicated fairy folklorists!” And Fred Lobb of Chinese Folktales summed it all up, saying “Seeing Fairies is a boon to the scholarship on folklore. I highly recommend it for anyone interested in psychology, anthropology and parapsychology.”

Fairy encounters in the 20th century? Are you kidding me? But wait, you’re willing to consider the possibility of ETs in our midst, but “fairies” are beyond your boggle threshold? Think again. To begin with there is not that much difference between who reports these kinds of experiences: they are business men and women, housewives, journalists, clergymen, bus drivers, school teachers, university professors, soldiers, artists, authors, poets, musicians, actresses, and many others. All of their encounters are reported in a just published book, Seeing Fairies: From the Lost Archives of the Fairy Investigation Society, Authentic Reports of Fairies in Modern Times by Marjorie T. Johnson. In fact, this book is the biggest collection of fairy sightings ever assembled: more than 400 in all. And the backstory of how this book came about—and its significance—is told in a riveting introduction by historian Simon Young, who has written extensively on the middle ages and fairy lore.

A Very Important Book

May 5, 2014

Yes, John Keel’s The Mothman Prophecies is a great book; it’s a scary and very entertaining story. But that book doesn’t explain what Keel really thought about all the craziness going on in our world. The book that connects the dots is The Eighth Tower, which is made up of material that was left out of The Mothman Prophecies then expanded upon by Keel, who is regarded by many as one of the legendary writers on the paranormal. Keel’s long forgotten classic on the science behind many paranormal phenomena has been reprinted by Anomalist Books as both a print and an ebook and people have made it our newest best-seller. “This is—in my opinion—the one Keel title, more than any other,” writes Nick Redfern in his review of the book on Mysterious Universe, “that really gets close to figuring out where the nightmarish monsters, strange creatures, ‘aliens,’ magical entities and more that so many have witnessed actually come from. Welcome to the world of what Keel called ‘the superspectrum’… Keel tackles the subject in such a refreshing and thought-provoking fashion that it becomes hard to deny that the man was clearly on the right path, even if—by his own admittance—much of the nature of the superspectrum remains mystifying…a very important book.”

Our two bestselling controversial history books are now available in ebook editions for Kindle, Nook, Kobo, and Apple. First and foremost we have Brad Steiger’s thought-provoking and pioneering work on the existence of a global prehistoric civilization, Worlds Before Our Own. We also have Patrick Huyghe’s provocative heretical history of who was first in the Americas, Columbus Was Last. In the months to come we will be issuing ebook editions of other reprinted works from the Anomalist Books stable. Next up, we’ll have Jacques Vallee’s definitive work on UFOs, his Alien Contact Trilogy: Dimensions, Confrontation, and Revelations.

A Well-Documented Page-Turner

February 13, 2014

Writing one great book is difficult enough. Writing a second that’s as good as the first is a hurdle that few writers manage to cross successfully. But Lyle Blackburn has done just that. The reviewers loved his first book, The Beast of Boggy Creek, and they are just as enthusiastic about Lizard Man: The True Story of the Bishopville Monster. In Cryptomundo, David Weatherly wrote: “Just as he did with the Legend of Boggy Creek, Blackburn gets to the roots of the Lizard Man reports, interviewing witnesses, going to the locations and generally leaving no stone unturned. It is, in fact, Lyle’s trekking through the Lizard Man’s territory that gives the book its driving energy, creating a page turner that any mystery novelist would be jealous of.” The blogger at Monsters and Magic calls the book “a stand out,” and writes: “Lizard Man is a fascinating read that will leave the reader with not only a thorough knowledge of the topic but also a real taste of the mystery surrounding the case.” And Lon Strickler of Phantoms & Monsters called it ”…an expertly crafted allegory that is informative as well as entertaining.” We are certain that you will love Blackburn’s latest tour de force as well.

If you are reading this you already know about The Mothman Prophecies, John Keel’s best known work thanks in large part to Hollywood which made a film out of his non-fiction cryptozoological thriller starring Richard Gere and Laura Linney. But few people are aware that Keel wrote a follow-up to that work entitled The Eighth Tower: On Ultraterrestrials and the Superspectrum in which he wraps up all the High Weirdness—beams of light, voices from the heavens, the “little people,” gods and devils, ghosts and monsters, and UFOs—into one Grand Unified Theory. This dark work, in which Keel pulls no punches, probes the ultimate question: Are we pawns in a celestial game? This new Anomalist Books edition of The Eighth Tower is now available in print for just $15.95—a far cry from the exorbitant prices ($128-to-$2,800) that the book has been going for on the used book market.

A Masterful and Magical Study

December 13, 2013

Reviewers agree that Karl Shuker’s Mirabilis: A Carnival of Cryptozoology and Unnatural History is a veritable cryptozoological feast. “In this gripping collection Shuker explores the farthest boundaries of natural history, which include some very wild areas indeed,” writes Peter Rogerson in Magonia. In his review in Fortean Times, Jerome Clark has one criticism of the book (too many exclamation points!), but otherwise finds it “blissful.” Calling “his writing is clear and concise,“ Clark explains that ”the startlingly prolific and well-versed Shuker—who unlike most cryptozoologists, has a doctorate in zoology—expounds with insight on mysteries of the animal realm. Much of the material seems unfamiliar even to those of us who know something of cryptozoology… As always Shuker’s breadth of arcane knowledge prompts an amazed and admiring shaking of the head.” And finally, writing for Mysterious Universe, Nick Redfern says that “Mirabilis is not just a commentary on case upon case, and creature upon creature. Instead, we see Karl putting on his Sherlock Holmes-style cape and deer-stalker hat, and actually trying to figure out—detective-style—what the many and varied baffling beasts under his microscope actually are. And there are plenty of them… A masterful and magical study of some of the wildest, biggest, weirdest, and freakiest critters said to haunt the darker corners of our world…”

Now Available: Lizard Man

October 25, 2013

What would Lyle Blackburn do for an encore? That question on everyone’s mind now has an answer. The second stop on the cryptozoological roadmap for the author of the bestselling book The Beast of Boggy Creek is almost a thousand to the east of Fouke, Arkansas: specifically Bishopville, South Carolina, home of a real-life “creature from the black lagoon.” Blackburn’s new book, Lizard Man: The True Story of the Bishopville Monster, is the story of a hair-raising, seven-foot-tall, scaly humanoid creature seen by numerous witnesses, investigated by local law officials, and covered by national news media. Now you can follow Lyle Blackburn and his partner, Cindy Lee, as they revisit the sighting locations, speak to the living eyewitnesses, and consider all possible theories in their search for the truth behind the Lizard Man encounters. Nick Redfern calls the book “an enthralling, chillingly atmospheric, and deeply revealing look at a strange and controversial legend.” Don’t miss it!

Anatomy of a Bestseller

September 13, 2013

If there is one reason Ardy Clarke’s Encounters With Star People has turned out to be a bestseller, it’s probably because of the unique point of view the author offers on the phenomenon. And that’s because no one other than the author “can lay claim to the particular constellation of contacts, skills, and knowledge that make possible Encounters With Star People. Indian communities tend to be closed to outsiders, but over more than two decades, Clarke’s cross-tribal ties and sympathetic personality led her to a thousand informants willing to relate their sometimes highly strange UFO experiences,” states Jerome Clark in his review of the book in Fortean Times, which he concludes by saying: “Whatever you make of these accounts, you’re likely to enjoy this unusual book…” Not surprisingly, Peter Rogerson at Magonia views the book as “an interesting example of cultural assimilation…” but  admits that “some of these stories may be based on anomalistic personal experiences…” We’ll let Micah Hanks, who straddles these two points of view in his review the book for Mysterious Universe, have the last word: “It is very interesting to see a thorough study of American Indian tales as they relate to the stories of Star People and related phenomenon, but not entirely having to do with the conventional notions of “Native American mythology” associated with legends that may, in truth, only bear some relation to UFOs today (keeping in mind, all the while, that many modern tribes still maintain the view that present day UFO phenomenon actually is a manifestation or, perhaps, even a continuation of known visitations that occurred in the ancient past). Whether the mythos surrounding UFOs necessarily plays into a more complex, modern counterpart involving actual visitation by extraterrestrials is anyone’s guess; but the stories Clarke relates in her Encounters With Star People nonetheless inspire a lot of questions about the present day phenomenon. It is a field of study which, if anything, remains rife amidst the Native cultures in modern day America, and certainly points to some pervasive element underlying our legends and folklore that could, at very least, have some strange physical counterpart.”