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mmr-sm“At long last,” George M. Eberhart begins his lengthy review of Karl Shuker’s Mystery Cats of the World Revisited: Blue Tigers, King Cheetahs, Black Cougars, Spotted Lions, and More in the Summer 2021 issue of the Journal of Scientific Exploration. “After 31 years, the first book by noted British zoologist and cryptozoologist Karl Shuker has been expanded and updated. Mystery Cats of the World  first appeared in 1989 and was the only book to review feline cryptids worldwide. In this 2020 edition, Shuker repeats this admirable achievement, and in the process gives us a solid overview of current knowledge of felid evolution, taxonomy, and genetic variation. In fact, the only feline mystery cat he does not describe is Hello Kitty. This edition will leave you purring with cryptozoological delight.”

ROTD2It took nearly a century for anyone to begin a detailed examination of the events Charles Fort described in that now classic work, The Book of the Damned. And now just a couple of years after the release of the work that began that reexamination—Redemption of the Damned: Vol. 1 Aerial Phenomena—Martin Shough and Wim van Utrecht have completed Volume 2 of that monumental workRedemption of the Damned, Volume 2: Sea & Space Phenomena—this time focusing on events that took place on the sea and in space. As George Eberhart, the former senior editor of American Libraries, writes in the Foreword: “Martin Shough and Wim van Utrecht use an arsenal of 21st-century tools, both online and in archives, to deconstruct and reconstruct the astronomical, meteorological, and oceanographic anomalies that Fort has puzzled us with since 1919. Yes, Fort cherry-picked his facts to tell a good story, as the authors point out. Nonetheless, they manage to extract the marrow from many of these old bones, and in doing so, take Fort to a new level of relevance.” No one who calls himself or herself a true fortean should be without the knowledge revealed in the two volumes of this essential reference work.

smileFunny how things happen, like publishing a book on miracles in a year as fraught as 2020. But Michael Grosso’s Smile of the Universe: Miracles in an Age of Disbelief is certainly not your run-of-the-mill book of miracles. David E. Presti, professor of neurobiology at the University of California, Berkeley, says that “Michael Grosso has written a sophisticated philosophical and scientific analysis of miracles—a universal phenomenon perhaps never-before investigated so thoroughly in such a sober and open-minded manner.” Bob Ricard, in his review the book in Fortean Times, writes: “Grosso discusses in detail an extensive range of phenomena with which ‘science’ has failed to engage, except to argue that they have no reality or causation within the ‘scientific’ doctrines of physicality and materialism…Grosso’s prose is clear, methodical, and open-minded, and like Fort, exhorts us to have confidence in questioning limitations set by others, because ‘miracles violate nothing but intellectual provincialism.'” And Michael Peter Langevin, editor of The Echo World, sees in this tale of “unexplainable, documented occurrences” Grosso’s underlying optimism: “In this wonderful book Michael puts forth the premise that the transformation of society and human nature is possible.”

“An Extraordinary Book”

October 21, 2020

ssss-frontThose are the words of the late oceanographer Paul LeBlond describing the new book by researcher and historian David Goudsward, Sun, Sand, and Sea Serpents. Likewise Magonia editor John Rimmer calls it “an important book” and “an excellent read.” Why is it so good?  Jerome Clark, in Fortean Times, explains: “What makes this book stand apart from the competition is the author’s deep research, critical intelligence and knowledge of recognised, if sometimes obscure, animal life.” But maybe Ulrich Magin, in Network for Cryptozoology, sums it up best: “Goudsward’s book is highly recommended—a book that confirms rather than refutes the existence of the sea serpent, precisely because so many known sightings find a sober explanation, which makes the rest of the unexplained cases stand out all the more clearly.”

mmr-smHow is it possible to improve on the only indisputably definitive work on mystery cats in existence? Well, Karl Shuker has done just that. His very first book, Mystery Cats of the World, is a classic of the cryptozoological literature that’s now highly sought after by collectors and lauded by cryptozoologists and mainstream zoologists alike for its scrupulously scientific, objective analyses. Now, after more than 30 years, Shuker has delivered Mystery Cats of the World Revisited: Blue Tigers, King Cheetahs, Black Cougars, Spotted Lions, and More, a fully illustrated, updated, greatly-expanded edition of that original work that examines many new mystery cats reports as well as revisits those previously featured in the original 1989 edition. This beautiful new book is more than 400 large-format pages long with more than 80 illustrations and weighs a hefty 1.5 pounds. So just what are these enigmatic cat-like animals that have been glimpsed in wild and lonely areas of the world?

dpWe don’t know anyone who can pick an idea apart better, exposing its faults and highlighting its values, than philosopher and parapsychologist Stephen E. Braude, whose books The Limits of Influence, The Gold Leaf Lady, and Immortal Remains are classics in the field. In his latest work, Dangerous Pursuits, Mediumship, Mind, and Music, Braude does what he does best on issues of mediumship, super psi, multiple personality, and survival. And he caps off this volume with an excursion into the language of jazz improvisation, noting of course its links to psi. None other than Stanley Krippner found the book “a delight to read and to contemplate,” while Charles Tart entered an altered state, calling it “Excellent!”

smileOur newest book is subtitled “Miracles in an Age of Disbelief.” We think that at this perilous moment in time everyone—including disbelievers—would welcome a miracle. While we can’t make that happen, we can offer you philosopher Michael Grosso’s examination of miracles in Smile of the Universe, in which he looks beyond religion and science to better understand the parapsychological roots of miraculous phenomena. Prepublication reviewers love the book: “a tour de force,” says David E. Presti, professor of neurobiology, University of California, Berkeley, and Stafford Betty, Ph.D. in theology, calls the book “a brilliant and inspiring reading adventure.” Oh, and if you’re wondering about that title: The word miracle is rooted in a Sanskrit syllable smi, from which we get the English word smile. So a miracle refers to a smile induced by certain sensations of awe, beauty, and wonder. Let the universe smile upon us. Please.

ssss-frontDon’t think for a minute that this is just another sea serpent book.  Sun, Sand, and Sea Serpents manages to be not only a hard-nosed look at sea serpent reports from Florida, the lower eastern seaboard, and the Caribbean, but one of the most fun reads in the history of the genre.  Why?  Because author Dave Goudsward knows how to tell a story, going back to the original sources and interviews to get the facts straight, the science right, and the background for the proper perspective. And some of the stories he tells are real doozies. Sometimes the sea serpent is not the most unbelievable part of the story. After reading this book, you will likely never look at a sea serpent report in the same way again.

Brilliant and Informative

November 21, 2019

fs4-frontThose are the words of Dr. Diana Pasulka, author of American Cosmic, writing about our recently published book, Forbidden Science 4: The Spring Hill Chronicles, The Journals of Jacques Vallee 1990-1999. She continues, “Science is finally catching up with Vallee’s speculations, laid bare in Forbidden Science where this venture/adventure is documented, inextricably linked to discovery.” In Magonia, Jenny Randles said, “Here as reader you get what really happened day by day from a true giant of the UFO field.” And John Alexander, writing in the Journal of Scientific Exploration, said: “The rich tapestry of this chronicle reveals background material on a vast array of topics. What is guaranteed is that you will learn things about subjects you never knew existed…This is a veritable Who’s Who in the study of UFOs and other phenomena…it is mandatory reading.” But perhaps Jerome Clark summed it up best in Fortean Times: “As a unique original thinker, and the smartest guy in most rooms where ufologists congregate, Vallee is formidable…His contributions to UFO study equal anybody’s in their scope and insight…Forbidden Science 4 is a commendably open portrayal of the man, his strengths and flaws in full, brave view. If you care about this subject, you had better read it.”

SC-smThe work of Michael Mayes entitled Shadow Cats: The Black Panthers of North America has drawn widespread praise from both advocates and critics alike. Sean Whitley, director of the documentary Southern Fried Bigfoot, says “It’s a hard-to-put-down investigation of the black panther mystery. Two paws up!” Reviewing the book for Mysterious Universe, Nick Redfern says that “..this is one of the best studies of the [black panther] phenomenon in the United States that I have read…Mayes does a good job of dissecting the eye-witness testimony… Some of the photographic data is impressive and eye-opening.” Writing for the Grayson • Olive Hill Quarterly, Jeremy D. Wells says that “the book is a compelling, confounding and comprehensive look at a phenomenon that captures the imagination and deserves more serious consideration.” Gerry Russell, writing for Magonia, says: “I was rather sceptical when I first started reading this book but I feel I am becoming a convert!… an exciting and worthwhile read.” But perhaps the highest praise has come from well-known skeptic Sharon Hill who writes: “”Mayes deserved congratulations for this bringing this book to print…there is no comprehensive volume on this topic so it deserved to be tackled…Mayes has a hair sample from a reported car collision but can’t get any experts willing to examine it. This is a shame. I do hope someone will step up and take a look…[the book] adopted a logical progression that was natural and comprehensible – exactly the approach that should be used to communicate to a lay audience…This volume usefully fills a niche in modern cryptozoological literature.” Congratulations, Mr. Mayes!